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Thread: Vitamins and Minerals - Are supplements needed ?

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    Vitamins and Minerals - Are supplements needed ?

    Vitamins and Minerals - Are supplements needed ?


    Minerals


    Calcium - Vital for building and maintaining a strong skeletal structure in growing reptiles, as well as for proper function of the nervous system at the cellular level. Crickets, mealworms, and other food items generally do not naturally have enough available calcium to support this rapid, healthy growth.

    Phosphorus - The current consensus is that the calcium to phosphorus ratio of all reptile diets should be at least 2 to 1. In other word, the food should have twice as much calcium as phosphorus. Otherwise, the calcium simply cannot be absorbed or utilized by the animals !

    Vitamins


    Reptiles need vitamin D3 in their diet in order to effectively absorb dietary calcium . It will come from 2 sources or a combination of both ! The first source, and the one most utilized by wild reptiles, is exposure to ultraviolet (UV) lighting. When a particular wavelength of ultraviolet light (UVB) hits reptilian skin, a series of biochemical reactions occur which ultimately lead to the animal synthesis of vitamin D3. In captivity, the only way your pets will receive vitamin D3 is if they are exposed to unfiltered sunlight and / or exposed to a reptile bulb designed to emit UVB, or through dietary supplements.

    A pet reptile should get adequate vitamins from a varied diet or insects, greens, or rodents. However, it is common for owners and animals alike to develop favorite foods, and if fed excessively or exclusively the animal may be missing out on vitamins not found in that staple dietary item. The use of a multi-vitamin once or twice a week on the food of most reptiles will correct any deficiencies created by an unbalanced diet.

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    Moderator Johnny's Avatar
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    I only have one point where I am not sure, should the calcium to phosphorus ratio be at least 2:1 for all reptiles? Or is it only for herbivores while carnivores have different needs? I am not clear on that.

    Other than that, since there is no viable way to check with accuracy the results of the diet, I am pro supplements.
    I provide my iguana with Calcium and Multivitamins. When I had a specialized reptile vet in my city, I would go and get calcium levels on Johnny's blood tested regularly. Now that I do not have that option, I trust that I do my best.
    How can we get the absence or not of vitamins measured?
    Hello all my name is Mariana, mother to the green iguana Johnny

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    ​This information was for reptiles in general ! I do about the same as you do Mariana . Short of blood tests from a Vet I don't know how else one would check !

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Slick For This Useful Post: dimzel (23-09-17)
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    I think most vertebrates are recommended to get 2:1 Calcium to Phosphorus ratio.

    Supplements have to be given to reptiles very carefully though. Too much calcium can act as a binder and it can block absorption of essential nutrients. Too much D3 & calcium supplements can calcify internal organs.

    It's always the best to give them correct/nutritious diet & give them sun light/UVB light so they can produce their own D3 they need.

    I agree with Mariana. I'm pro supplements too but too much or too less are harmful.
    Hello~ my name is Taka. I have a red iguana Charby

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    Administrator coolmoon's Avatar
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    Good information. I am for using supplements since we can not give the variety of food they would get in the wild or the appropriate UVB.
    Saving the world, one reptile at a time. They make me want to be a better person. My name is Ann.

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    Snr Moderator dimzel's Avatar
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    Very good information !!! Thank you!Name:  Хлопает.gif
Views: 15
Size:  3.1 KB
    My name is Irina. Sorry my mistakes in English.

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